Professor Cites Bible in Faulting Tax Policies


At a time when some voters are asking how the religious views of candidates will shape their policies, a professor’s discovery of how little tax the biggest landowners in her state paid to finance the government has prompted some other legal scholars to scour religious texts to explore the moral basis of tax and spending policies.

Prof. Susan Pace Hamill says 18 states, especially Alabama, seriously violate biblical principles in the way they tax and spend.

The professor, Susan Pace Hamill, is an expert at tax avoidance for small businesses and teaches at the University of Alabama Law School. She also holds a degree in divinity from a conservative evangelical seminary, where her master’s thesis explored how Alabama’s tax-and-spend policies comport with the Bible.

Professor Hamill says that since Judeo-Christian ethics “is the moral compass chosen by most Americans” it is vital that these policies be compared with the texts on which they are based. Another professor says she is the first to address this head on, inspiring work by others.

Her findings, embraced by some believers and denounced by others, has also stirred research everywhere from Arizona State to New York University into the connection between religious teachings and government fiscal practices.

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One thought on “Professor Cites Bible in Faulting Tax Policies

  1. I did a blog post on this news story as well, and predictably it brought out the YOYO (You’re On Your Own) fiscal conservatives, including one who maintains that “a low-tax policy is a form of social justice,” because that is supposed to create more jobs.

    I’m not buying it.

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